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Why Is Healthcare So Damn High?

Here's why you're paying so much for healthcare

Healthcare costs in the United States have been steadily increasing and have caused significant financial distress to many American families. Despite the widespread availability of health insurance, many individuals still struggle to afford necessary medical care.

This issue is not only affecting low-income households but is also creeping into middle-class families who find themselves unable to cover out-of-pocket expenses. With insurance premiums and deductibles reaching new heights, the situation is looking rather bleak for the future. In this episode, I go over a recent survey by the Kaiser Family Foundation highlighting the severity of the situation.

About half of U.S. adults reported difficulties in affording healthcare costs, with one in four experiencing problems paying medical bills in the past year. This financial pressure has led many to delay or forgo essential medical treatments, including filling prescriptions. Many respondents reported skipping medications or cutting pills in half to save money.

Even more alarming is that 25 percent of adults have skipped or postponed healthcare due to cost concerns. These statistics underscore the urgent need for a more sustainable healthcare system that people can actually afford.

The problem shows no sign of abating anytime soon, and it is hardworking Americans who are suffering for it.

In conclusion, while the rising cost of healthcare remains a significant challenge, it has become even more imperative to advocate for solutions that could result in a more manageable system. People should have far more control over their healthcare decisions in 2024. Unfortunately, this is not the case. As discussions and legislative efforts continue, it is crucial for the public to stay informed and engaged in advocating for solutions that address the financial strains of healthcare.

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